• Review

    THE ACCIDENT|| Gail Schimmel

    Okay, so off the bat let me just say I had never heard of South African Author Gail Schimmel. I may seem like I’ve been living under a rock considering the pleasant surprise this first encounter was. But alas, here I are. The Accident follows the life of Julia, a woman raised by a broken mother, Catherine, following a fatal accident. Julia has sort of had to mother herself and navigate through life on wobbly terms as her deeply depressed mother has practically just washed her hands off all responsibility. Until. The Accident – Schimmel’s FOURTH novel – is a tale of second chances. In here is a lesson on…

  • Review

    ONE DARK THRONE|| Kendare Blake

    This is the sequel to Three Dark Crowns and therefore cannot be read or reviewed in isolation. In this sequel, the real games begin. At the end of Three Dark Crowns we were left with a breathtaking cliff hanger and all sorts of questions unanswered. So, the sequel was a definite must. The triplets are still scrambling for the crown, and though we thought we had lost one, it turns out we thought wrong, and what is about to ensue is a twisted story of the need for family and the hunger for power. Blake adds dimensions to her world that we didn’t particularly expect. We finally also learn if…

  • Review

    DEAR SUMMER|| Mahlogonolo B. Masebe

    This is the first non-fiction book to feature on my blog. So we are driving blind folks … enjoy the ride! Masebe is a South African based author, this is her debut book and it is self-published. I am constantly and instantly weary of self-published authors. I think the advent of information and technology has tried to diminish the importance and impact of finding a good publisher and going through the struggle of selling your story, refining it and allowing it to change form (not necessarily message) from when it was first conceptualised. This I have discovered, with the few self-published authors that I have read, makes or breaks their…

  • Review

    ORIGIN|| Dan Brown

    I havent’ read all of the Professor Robert Langdon books, but immediately one doesn’t get the sense that they cannot catch him on this adventure without knowing his prior exploits. In fact the only book with Langdon I’ve ever read was The Da Vinci Code. I tried to watch the movie versions of other books such as Angels and Demons and Inferno. But if you are anything like me you will understand what I mean when I say it creeps me out watching a movie adoptation of a book I haven’t read. Even when I know the chances are very high that I will never read it. For that 0.00001%…

  • Review

    HEX|| Thomas Olde Heuvelt

    Black Spring has an awful secret and  they have kept it for decades. An ugly witch from the 17thcentury  whose eyes and mouth have been sewn shut renderes the townsfolk haunted and Black Spring inescapable by those born there and those who later settle there. It’s in the unraveling of the witch’s story that Black Spring’s citizens are revealed for who they are and how much in common each of us has with the ugly Black-Rock witch. It’s as though the constact juxtaposition between the witch and the town’s inhabitants is a literal reflection of how we as society treat ‘the other’ in our midst. Hex follows the story of…

  • Review

    WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS|| Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    The thing with society is just how easy it is to fall into the way things are done without scrutinizing the reasons and the presidents one sets for their own lives. It wasn’t until I was a young adult that I even became uncomfortable with gender roles in my society. I belong to a very traditionally Xhosa family and clan. Mostly, as with a majority of African tribes, it is very patriachal, yet it is the wives, the matriarchs from both my mom and dad’s families that outlived their husbands and as such had to continue the task of instilling values in them and the next generation. I will say…